Tony Buzan’s mind maps really do work – so give them a go!

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So Mr Tony ‘mind maps’ Buzan is still going strong then! 
All law students should perk up when they come across his name – they might just find their legal studies transformed if they follow the principles of his mind maps. And anyone doing CPD courses or other studying, for example, will benefit.
I first came across mind maps as a journalism student before I decided to do a law degree (some 18-19 years ago – I still have an early book hidden somewhere in the dark recesses of my study), but it really came into its own for me when I was an LLB undergraduate. And they proved invaluable when revising for exams.
So what are mind maps? Essentially, they are diagrams representing words, ideas and, for example, legal principles and judgments, in a linked format organised around a central heading or key word. Their pictorial or diagrammatical form makes the subject matter more easily digested by the brain and remembered than a sheet of plain text.
How do mind maps work in practice? In simple terms, imagine you’re in the lecture hall, or revising a particular topic. Turn your blank page so that it’s in ‘landscape’ form and put the main topic heading in the middle in a box. Link this heading to each subheading or subtopic by a line or arrow to another part of the page. If these in turn have their own subtopic do the same from the subheading box. Use lines or arrows to make extra notes related to those individual headings.  
You will find examples of this on Buzan’s website at www.thinkbuzan.com to see how they work in practice. Mind maps are a far easier form of taking notes and revising – and their very format means that the principles, cases, etc, that you mark down on the mind map are far more likely to stick in your mind. And they do work: the fact that Buzan’s principles have survived for so long is testament to their proven success.  
And I can recommend the benefits of studying using mind maps from personal experience
So if you’re a law student or trainee do get hold of one of Buzan’s books to find out more about how they work. Or go onto his website – free trials are on offer although a brief look at the price thereafter makes me suspect law students would be better off getting hold of a book.
You can also follow him on Twitter if you’re super keen@ Tony_Buzan

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